May 152016
 

A century into the future, humanity lives mostly on the sea. Gigantic whale herds are tended by submariners, and vast plankton farms feed the world.

Walter Franklin, once a space engineer, now works on a submarine patrol. This novel tells the story of his adventures, including Franklin’s capture of an enormous kraken at 12,000 feet under the sea; his search for a monstrous sea serpent; and the thrilling rescue of a sunken submarine-all set against the backdrop of a futuristic world that’s both imaginative and believable.

Summary from Amazon.com

The Deep Range

Mar 132016
 

I remember watching 2001: A Space Odyssey when I was a kid, but aside from a few key scenes, I don’t remember it. So when my dad offered me a copy of the book to read, I wondered if I’d remember more of the movie while reading it.

Now, I want to watch the movie again. I can’t say that the book is bringing back memories of the movie, but it is making wish I did remember it. If it’s even a fraction as good as the book, it will be one of my favorite sci-fi movies.

I don’t usually read a lot of sci-fi outside of my favorite sci-fi authors. Arthur C. Clarke is close to the top of my favorite sci-fi authors now. I’m having a hard time putting this book down.

Written when landing on the moon was still a dream, made into one of the most influential films of our century, brilliant, compulsive, prophetic, 2001: A Space Odyssey tackles the enduring theme of man’s place in the universe. Including a new Foreword by the author and a fascinating new introduction by Stephen Baxter, this special edition is an essential addition to every SF reader’s collection.

On the moon, an enigma is uncovered. So great are the implications that, for the first time, men are sent out deep into the solar system. But, before they can reach their destination, things begin to go wrong. Horribly wrong.

Summary from Amazon.com

Dec 102013
 

The 50th Anniversary Edition of one of Arthur C. Clarke’s best-loved collections featuring a brand new White Hart story written in collaboration with Stephen Baxter. Although written, as the author informs us in his Introduction to the 1969 edition, in such diverse locations as New York, Miami, Columbo and Sydney there is something inherently English about these stories. London’s famed Fleet Street district has changed dramatically in the five decades since the collection’s first appearance as a Ballantine paperback original… and, of course, many of the regulars of the White Hart (based on the White Horse pub on Fetter Lane) are no longer with us. But the White Hart’s most prominent raconteaur, Harry Purvis can still be found propping up the bar and regaling us all once again with tales of quirky and often downright eccentric scientists and inventors. Here, for example, are a man who could control a giant squid; a man who could silence an entire orchestra at the flick of a switch; and a French genius who invents a machine that can record all human pleasures and transmit them to any client rich enough to afford such luxury. And rounding up the whole affair is ‘Time Gentlemen, Please’, in which we encounter a gadget able to accelerate the passage of time in a small volume… immensely useful for vaccine research where an entire year’s worth of study could be completed in seconds. But the hapless inventor finds himself walled off by immobile air molecules… and even worse. It’s a tale which points out, with some nostalgic resonance, that we simply cannot slow the passage of time. A fitting last word for one of SF’s most enduring watering holes!

Summary from Amazon.com

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