Apr 032016
 

Clive Barker is one of my favorite writers. There’s something fascinating about his beautifully twisted mind. From the first page, Clive Barker draws me in and doesn’t let go, even after the story is over.

Weaveworld is a perfect example of how words can be used to paint intricate, beautiful and horrifying pictures in the mind of the reader.

I’m trying to take my time reading Weaveworld, but I’m having a hard time putting it down.

Here is storytelling on a grand scale — the stuff of which a classic is made. Weaveworld begins with a rug — a wondrous, magnificent rug — into which a world has been woven. It is the world of the Seerkind, a people more ancient than man, who possesses raptures — the power to make magic. In the last century they were hunted down by an unspeakable horror known as the Scourge, and, threatened with annihilation, they worked their strongest raptures to weave themselves and their culture into a rug for safekeeping. Since then, the rug has been guarded by human caretakers.

The last of the caretakers has just died.

Vying for possession of the rug is a spectrum of unforgettable characters: Suzanna, granddaughter of the last caretaker, who feels the pull of the Weaveworld long before she knows the extent of her own powers; Calhoun Mooney, a pigeon-raising clerk who finds the world he’s always dreamed of in a fleeting glimpse of the rug; Immacolata, an exiled Seerkind witch intent on destroying her race even if it means calling back the Scourge; and her sidekick, Shadwell, the Salesman, who will sell the Weaveworld to the highest bidder.

In the course of the novel the rug is unwoven, and we travel deep into the glorious raptures of the Weaveworld before we witness the final, cataclysmic struggle for its possession.

Barker takes us to places where we have seldom been in fiction–places terrifying and miraculous, humorous, and profound. With keen psychological insight and prodigious invention, his trademark graphic vision balanced by a spirit of transcendent promise, Barker explores the darkness and the light, the magical and the monstrous, and celebrates the triumph of the imagination.

Summary from Amazon.com

Weaveworld

Sep 272015
 

I’ve been excited about this book for some time, Clive Barker being one of my favorite authors and all, but haven’t managed to remember to pick it up until now. As soon as I opened the box, I started reading.

I noticed right away that the pages looked old and it smelled like an old or used book even though the outside was unblemished. Almost every page had oily-looking blotches on it and the edges of the pages were dark, like the book had spent years in a house full of smokers. I was concerned it might be moldy or something and was about to complain, but I searched the web instead for pictures of the pages of Mister B. Gone.

What I found were images of pages that looked exactly the book I was holding in my hand. Even the oily-looking spots were in the exact same places. So, I don’t know about the old smell, but it seems it’s supposed to look that way. Just a warning for anyone that buys the book and has the same experience. Search google images for Mister B. Gone and you’ll see what I mean.

You hold in your hands not a book at all, but a terrifying embodiment of purest evil. Can you feel the electric tingle in your fingers as you are absorbed by the demon Jakabok’s tale of his unintentional ascent from the depths of the Inferno? Do you sense the cold dread worming its way into your bloodstream, your sinews, the marrow of your bones as you read more deeply into his earthly education and unspeakable acts? The filth you now grasp has been waiting patiently for you for nearly six hundred years. And now, before you are completely in its thrall, you would do well to follow the foul creature’s admonition and destroy this abomination of ink and paper before you turn a single leaf and are lost forever.

You have been warned.

Summary from Amazon.com

Jan 152014
 

There are things worse than death. There are games so seductively evil, so wondrously vile, no gambler can resist. Amid the shadow-scarred rubble of World War II, Joseph Whitehead dared to challenge the dark champion of life’s ultimate game. Now a millionaire, locked in a terror-shrouded fortress of his own design, Joseph Whitehead has hell to pay. And no soul is safe from this ravaging fear, the resurrected fury, the unspeakable desire of…

Summary from Amazon.com

Marty Strauss, a gambling addict recently released from prison, is hired to be the personal bodyguard of Joseph Whitehead, one of the wealthiest men in the world. The job proves more complicated and dangerous than he thought, however, as Marty soon gets caught up in a series of supernatural events involving Whitehead, his daughter (who is a heroin addict), and a devilish man named Mamoulian, with whom Whitehead made a Faustian bargain many years earlier, during World War II. As time passes, Mamoulian haunts Whitehead using his supernatural powers (such as the ability to raise the dead), urging him to complete his pact with him. Eventually Whitehead decides to escape his fate after a few encounters with Mamoulian and having his wife, former bodyguard, and now his daughter Carys taken away from him. With hope still left to save Carys, Marty Strauss, although reluctant to get involved in the old man Whiteheads deserved punishment, decides to get involved and attempt to save the innocent gifted addict from being another victim to the damnation game.

Summary from Wikipedia.org

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