Jun 082016
 

I found another graphic for lay vs. lie that is a little clearer. The last one I posted was blurry. I’m not sure where it came from, but I posted it in case someone finds it useful.

I still have to look at it myself to make sure that I’m using the correct form. Second guessing, but I’d rather be sure.

This one also includes present participle which was missing from the first one I posted.

laylie2

Apr 132016
 

Whatever you do, please don’t over-animate your characters. Some writers have a bad habit of making their characters move and use body language every time they speak or sometimes every time they are mentioned in a scene. If your character is distressed, they might do one or two of the movements listed below, but they don’t tend to go through the whole list in a few pages.

This sheet could be much longer. For instance, I’d add “looking down and to the left” under lying and “gripping something so hard knuckles turn white” to anger, but this list can help you think of another body language you’ve seen people display under certain situations. As always, this is only a tool to make you think, not a comprehensive list…

body language

Nov 252015
 

I used to listen to a lot of podcasts and Grammar Girl was one of my favorites. In 2009, she covered Lay vs. Lie and I developed a problem where I didn’t think I had one before. Every time I used the past tense or past participle of lay or lie, it never sounded correct.

I started second guessing myself, so I went to the Grammar Girl website and snagged this little graphic to help.

Lay vs. Lie

Grammar Girl is a wonderful podcast. She provides short, useful tips to help improve your writing. If the battery in my iPod wasn’t malfunctioning from age and overuse, I’d still be listening.

Her most recent tip was about formatting internal dialog, which was helpful and informative.

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